About the Braves and Tebow: Is curiosity the same as ‘interest’?

Former NFL quarterback, Tim Tebow walks in the outfield during a baseball showcase on the campus of the University of Southern California, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2016 in Los Angeles. The Heisman Trophy winner works out for a big gathering of scouts on USC's campus in an attempt to start a career in a sport he hasn't played regularly since high school. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The now-famous Tebow Workout, cone included. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

The guess here is that the Atlanta Braves do — as Pedro Gomez of ESPN has reported — have interest in Tim Tebow. They did, after all, send both Brian Bridges (current scouting director) and Roy Clark (former scouting director) to Los Angeles to monitor his ballyhooed workout, and Gomez reports that they were one of five teams to meet with Tebow afterward.

So: There’s interest, yes. But this would seem to me to be interest, meaning curiosity, as opposed to outright We-Gotta-Have-Him lust.

If the Braves were to sign Tebow — still a significant “if” — I’d imagine their offer would be a minor-league contract, period. No promise of promotion to the majors in a year’s time. (The man hasn’t played baseball since 2005, when Brian McCann and Jeff Francoeur were rookies.) No guarantee of even an invitation to spring training.

Just a minor-league deal, the sort MLB organizations offer all the time with rather less fanfare. But that’s the thing: Where there’s Tebow, there’s fanfare — chiefly from ESPN, once his personal network and currently his employer.

If Tebow would be invited to spring training, it would sell a few tickets, sure. If he were to be placed on one of the Braves’ rookie-league teams — meaning next year; minor-league seasons are all but over — it would help that entity at the gate. It would also be a sideshow that threatens to become the show itself, and that’s what all interested MLB parties, not just the Braves, have to weigh: Is there enough potential in a 29-year-old footballer to warrant the distraction?

It wouldn’t surprise me if Tebow does sign a Braves’ contract. (Nothing the Braves do in the asset-allocation department surprises me.) It would be a shock if he lasts long in any organization. Baseball is hard. You might ask Michael Jordan.

Reader Comments 0

13 comments
TideDawg
TideDawg

Sign him! Give the sports writers something new to write about. He might draw a few extra fans at Rome. Michael Jordan drew a few when he tried it. Is Tebow still single.....makes you wonder doesn't it?

TideDawg
TideDawg

@58Supersports @TideDawg Guess you're the one with the dirty mind. Tebow does have a girlfriend, he just seem to able to pull the trigger on marriage.

POV1948
POV1948

If the front office is really trying to rebuild the Braves versus serving Liberty bean counters, what a ridiculous, distracting move this would be. Hey Johns, you're running a baseball team not a carnival side-show. Invest every resource you have, from $ to coach time and roster spots, in developing ballplayers with a future.  

TideDawg
TideDawg

@brushback69 He's related to Jeff Schultz isn't he? Or are they just kissin cousins!

58Supersports
58Supersports

Nothing to lose and maybe something to gain. What's AJC got to do with it  anyway, Mark?  He can't be any worse at baseball than some of AJC reporters.

Buschleaguer
Buschleaguer

The AJC can send Schultzie to Dublin to cover the Ramblin Wreck  but can't send Bradley to the Dome to cover the Dogs. Great another UGA season covered by the inane DawgNation.Nice work Mark mail in a column on a non story ,Tebow the Baseball Player.

OH:IO
OH:IO

@Buschleaguer


Bingo. 


Greatest opening ever and we get Bradley talking loser Braves and Tebow. 


Won't read dog local interest. 

patriotdog
patriotdog

Let him give it a shot. It's not anything earth shattering, it's a game.

dbom
dbom

Man, sports writers need to take a few basic sports economics classes to understand how they get paid (along with everyone else involved with sports).


But it's pretty simple so I'll break it down:


1) You need people to be interested in the sport and the players playing the sport.


2) A For-Profit business uses that interest to field a team on the hopes people will buy tickets to the game, buy team apparel and support the team in general to MAKE MONEY TO PAY IT'S EMPLOYEES.


3) Newspapers (and reporters) ALSO benefit when people are interested in the sport and players because people will pay (for instance) the AJC to read what people are saying about the team and players.


4) Everyone loses when the team is bad and/or no one cares about the players (including newspapers and reporters). 


5) Everyone wins when the team is good and/or people care about the players (including unheard-of sports reporters).


6) Having a player generate DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL interest in your team and selling more tickets and selling more jerseys and increasing coverage of the team and generating buzz is a good thing. A very good thing. Especially if the player is an A+ personality who is an amazing role modle for kids and adults alike. 


(Hint: Most fans like to cheer for the good guy...)


7) Calling this extra revenue and positive attention a "circus" is stupid. (Biting the hand the feeds you is an apt expression...)


8) Sports are not that important, so sports reporters shouldn't be snobs about it. It turns people off. 

Buschleaguer
Buschleaguer

The distraction factor is determined by the media coverage allotted to Tebow. it is doubtful that the major  networks will devote money and air time to follow a minor league player through the daily grind of the Florida state league. Maybe ESPN will turn this into a reality series "Tebow's Trouble With the Curve".

ChiefKnockAHoma
ChiefKnockAHoma

Definitely worth the flyer on him...  And why not promise him a spring training invite?  Who knows, he might do more than just sell some tickets and merchandise...